Sheet music

Coro: "Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam" (BWV 7 No. 1) for Woodwind Ensemble

6 parts20 pages06:025 years ago464 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet, Bassoon
Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam (Christ our Lord came to the Jordan), BWV 7,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the Feast of St. John the Baptist and led the first performance on 24 June 1724. It is the third chorale cantata from his second annual cycle of chorale cantatas, based on Martin Luther's "Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam", a hymn about baptism. Luther's first and last stanza are used unchanged (the former treated as a chorale fantasia, the latter as a four-part closing chorale) and an unknown librettist paraphrased the five inner stanzas into a corresponding number of recitatives and arias. The cantata is scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, two oboes d'amore, two solo violins, strings and basso continuo.

Bach composed the cantata for St John's Day in Leipzig as the third cantata of his second annual cycle, which began about two weeks before with O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, BWV 20, for the first Sunday after Trinity. The cycle was devoted to Lutheran hymns, typically rendered by keeping their text of the first and last stanza, while a contemporary poet reworded the inner stanzas.

The structure of seven movements begins with a chorale fantasia and ends, after a sequence of alternating arias and recitatives, with a closing chorale as a four-part setting. Bach increased the number of accompanying instruments for the arias, from only continuo to two solo violins, finally to two oboes d'amore and the strings.

The cantata in seven movements is scored for three vocal soloists (alto (A), tenor (T) and bass (B)), a four-part choir (SATB), two oboes d'amore (Oa), two solo violins (Vs, the second one only introduced in a later performance), two violins (Vl), viola (Va) and basso continuo (Bc).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_unser_Herr_zum_Jordan_kam,_BWV_7).

In the opening chorus, "Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam" (Christ our Lord came to the Jordan), the tenor has the melody as a cantus firmus, while the other voices sing free counterpoint. In the first cantata of the cycle, O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, BWV 20, Bach gave the cantus firmus of the chorale tune to the soprano, in the second, Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh darein, BWV 2, to the alto. The opening chorus resembles an Italian violin concerto. The musicologist Julian Mincham likens the "solo violin's persistent, rocking, wave-like idea" to the waves of the Jordan River. Alfred Dürr compares the vocal sections, all with the solo violin, to the solo sections of a violin concerto, as opposed to the tutti sections with the orchestra. John Eliot Gardiner interprets the movement as a French overture, "replete with grandiloquent baroque gestures to suggest both the processional entrance of Jesus and the powerful flooding of the River Jordan". Klaus Hofmann notes that the movement combines the old style of motet writing with the new type of solo concerto, and observes that "the main violin solo episodes ... are at first linked to the choral entries, but gradually assume larger proportions and greater independence as the movement progresses".

I created this arrangement of the opening Chorus: "Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam" (Christ our Lord came to the Jordan) for Woodwind Ensemble (2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).

Concerto in D Minor (Op. 9 No. 2) for Viola & Strings

5 parts20 pages12:45a year ago464 views
Viola(2), Violin(2), Cello
Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni (1671 – 1751) was an Italian Baroque composer. While famous in his day as an opera composer, he is mainly remembered today for his instrumental music, such as the concertos.

12 Concerti a cinque (op. 9) is a collection of concertos by the Italian composer Tomaso Albinoni, published in 1722.

The most famous piece from Albinoni's Opus 9 is the Concerto in D minor for oboe (Opus 9, Number 2). It is known for its slow movement. This concerto is probably the second best-known work of Albinoni after the Adagio in G minor (which was once believed to be a reconstruction based on a fragment by Albinoni). The concertos were dedicated to Maximilian II Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, and were first published in Amsterdam. It is possible, but not certain, that they were written in the Elector's court during a 1722 visit there by Albinoni during performances of his theatrical compositions.

This concerto in D minor for oboe and strings (Op 9 No 2) was originally composed for Oboe & Baroque orchestra and is considered to be Albinoni’s best solo concerto. After an energetic first movement, characterized by dotted rhythms, comes this ravishing Adagio movement. Accompanied by repeated chords in the lower strings and a harp-like configuration in the first violin, the soloist has a soaring line: here is Albinoni at his most appealingly melodic. The concluding movement keeps both soloist and orchestra busy with an imitative arpeggiated figure and plenty of counterpoint.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12_Conc...).

Although originally written for Oboe, Strings and Continuo, I created this arrangement for Solo Viola & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
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The underlying hyperlinks for the automatically-generated names (e.g., @Mike Magatagan") in posted comments/replies, contain invalid hyperlinks.For example: on a reply to an "Improving MuseScore.com" comment, the user name printed at the beginning of the comment contains an invalid reference (e.g., https://musescore.com/user/Mike%20Magatagan instead of the actual https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan )
This concerns one specific score by @Mike Magatagan namely the score https://musescore.com/mike_magatagan/scores/3004231If you click "Download" and choose "PDF including Parts"  the returned document is not a PDF but a "Not Found" error in XML format such as:  <Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>3004231/8628087/18f138fc27/general-parts/score-parts.pdf</Key><RequestId>7C02B5365F83A247</RequestId><HostId>++UrE4WzPLQL6n4nqY64Q5aoi88wzvJjJqfSUqDiw2DSzJYIpfHzp0IE6RMQiDFkoGyv5AujhOA=</HostId></Error>All other export formats work fine.As a test I've downloaded that score in mscz format, opened it up with musescore 2.3.2 and used "Save online" to save it privately into my account (private url https://musescore.com/jeetee/scores/5304581 ). From there I can download the PDF with parts without issues.Mike already tried to "update" his score by resaving the score to his account; we were hoping this would force the musescore server to regenerate this PDF. Alas this seems to not work.Can someone on your end ( @Ximich or @abruhanov probably) debug this and/or force the server to generate that file?Thanks!

Aria: "Herr, was du willt, soll mir gefallen" (BWV 156 No 4) for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts6 pages03:444 years ago463 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon
Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe (I am standing with one foot in the grave), BWV 156, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in Leipzig for the third Sunday after Epiphany and first performed it on 23 January 1729.

BWV 156 was Bach's fourth and last cantata for the third Sunday after Epiphany. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were taken from the Epistle to the Romans, rules for life (Romans 12:17–21), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the healing of a leper (Matthew 8:1–13). The librettist was Picander. He incorporated two chorale tunes: "Machs mit mir, Gott, nach deiner Güt" by Johann Herman Schein (1628) and "Herr, wie du willt, so schicks mit mir" by Kaspar Bienemann (1582).

The sinfonia was likely derived from an earlier oboe concerto and was later adapted as part of Bach's F-minor harpsichord concerto.

The opening sinfonia is scored for oboe, strings, and continuo. It is in F major and common time. Compared to the later version for harpsichord, the melody is straightforward and unembellished, and is harmonically conceived to prepare the second movement.

The second movement is a combined tenor aria and soprano chorale with obbligato strings. Unusually, it begins with a syncopated continuo line under unison strings. The movement also features sequences and harmonic contrasts.

Both bass recitatives are secco and in minor mode.[1] The first, the third movement of the cantata, is characterized by a disjunct melodic line and a concluding arioso line. The second, the fifth movement, is comparatively "lighter in mood and spirit". It anticipates the melody of the final chorale setting.

The alto aria is accompanied by oboe and violin in parallel thirds and sixths. The movement includes several instances of word painting. Formally, the movement is an altered da capo aria. It has a "generally sunny affect ... only momentarily disturbed by more charged harmonies".

The final movement is a four-part setting of the chorale in C major. The phrase lengths are varied to provide a "hint of timelessness".

Although the work was scored for three vocal soloists (alto, tenor, and bass), four-part choir, oboe, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Recitativo: "Ja, ja! mein Herz soll es bewahren" (BWV 248 No 32) for Flute & Cello

2 parts1 page00:523 years ago463 views
Flute, Cello
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Recitativo: "Ja, ja! mein Herz soll es bewahren” (Yes, yes, my heart shall cherish this) for Flute & Cello.
Chorale: "Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ" (BWV 116 No 1) for Trumpet & Strings
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Chorale: "Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ" (BWV 116 No 1) for Trumpet & Strings

5 parts11 pages05:564 years ago464 views
Trumpet, Strings(4)
Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ (Thou Prince of Peace, Lord Jesus Christ), BWV 116, is a church cantata written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1724 in Leipzig for the 25th Sunday after Trinity. It was first performed on 26 November 1724. The cantata is based on the hymn by Jakob Ebert (1601).

Bach wrote the cantata in 1724 for the 25th Sunday after Trinity as part of his second annual cycle of mostly chorale cantatas. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Thessalonians, the coming of the Lord (1 Thessalonians 4:13–18), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Tribulation (Matthew 24:25–28). The cantata text of an unknown author is based exclusively on the chorale in seven verses of Jakob Ebert (1601). The first and last verse in their original wording are movements 1 and 6 of the cantata, verses 2 to 4 were transformed to movements 2 to 4 of the cantata, and verses 5 and 6 were reworded for movement 5. The chorale is in a general way related to the gospel.

Bach first performed the cantata on 26 November 1724, which was that year the last Sunday of the liturgical year.

The opening chorus is a chorale fantasia, the soprano singing the cantus firmus and a horn playing the melody. It is embedded in an orchestral concerto with ritornells and interludes, dominated by the concertante solo violin. The treatment of the lower voices differs within the movement. In lines 1 and 2 and the final 7 they are set in homophonic block chords, in lines 3 and 4 they show vivid imitation, in lines 5 and 6 their faster movement contrasts to the melody.

The alto aria is accompanied by an oboe d'amore, equal to the voice part, expressing the soul's terror imagining the judgement. The following recitative begins as a secco, but the idea "Gedenke doch, o Jesu, daß du noch ein Fürst des Friedens heißest!" (Yet consider, o Jesus, that you are still called a Prince of Peace!), close to the theme of the cantata, is accompanied by a quote of the chorale melody in the continuo.

Rare in Bach's cantatas, three voices sing a trio, illustrating the "wir" (we) of the text "Ach, wir bekennen unsre Schuld" (Ah, we recognize our guilt), confessing and asking forgiveness together. It is accompanied only by the continuo. The following recitative is a prayer for lasting peace, accompanied by the strings and ending as an arioso.

The closing chorale is a four-part setting for the choir, horn, oboes and strings.

Although originally scored for soprano, alto, tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, horn, two oboes d'amore, two violins, viola, and basso continuo, I took some creative license with this piece to construct a solo Piccolo Trumpet (in A) part and an accompanying arrangement for Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Erschüttre dich nur nicht, verzagte Seele" (BWV 99 No 3) for String Trio

3 parts9 pages04:333 years ago462 views
Violin, Guitar, Cello
Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan (What God does is well done), BWV 99, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 15th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 17 September 1724. It is based on the hymn by Samuel Rodigast (1674).

Bach wrote the cantata in his second year Bach in Leipzig as part of his second annual cycle of chorale cantata for the 15th Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 17 September 1724. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Galatians, Paul's admonition to "walk in the Spirit" (Galatians 5:25–6:10), and from the Gospel of Matthew, from the Sermon on the Mount the demand not to worry about material needs, but to seek God's kingdom first (Matthew 6:23–34). The cantata text is based on the chorale "Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan" (1674) by Samuel Rodigast, which is generally related to the Gospel. Bach used the chorale in several other cantatas, especially later in another chorale cantata, Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan, BWV 100. All six stanzas begin with the same line. An unknown author kept the text of the first and last stanza, and paraphrased the inner four stanzas to as many movements, even keeping some of the rhymes in movement 2. In movement 4 he refers to the Gospel, paraphrasing the last verse to "Even if every day has its particular trouble". He introduced references to the cross twice in movement 5, stressing the suffering of Jesus and his followers.

The opening chorus is a distinct concerto movement. The strings open with a theme derived from the chorale melody. After 16 measures, a concertino of flute, oboe d'amore and violin I begins, the oboe playing the theme introduced by the strings, the flute playing a virtuoso counterpoint. Three measures later the voices enter, with the cantus firmus in the soprano, doubled by the horn. In the interlude following the Stollen of the bar form, finally all instruments participate in the concerto. The complete sequence is repeated for the second Stollen. For the Abgesang Bach combines differently, now strings and woods play tutti, the flute appears as a solo, alternating with the oboe. Therefore the instrumental postlude is not a repeat of the introduction, but a more complex combination. According to Julian Mincham, "this movement would still work perfectly well if the vocal parts were entirely removed."

The first secco recitative ends on a long coloratura on the last word "wenden", "turn" in "can turn aside my misfortune". The first aria is accompanied by the flute, another work for an able flute player, following Was frag ich nach der Welt, BWV 94 and Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott, BWV 101, composed only a few weeks earlier. The text mentions "erschüttern" (shudder); shaking and torment of the soul are pictured in virtuoso figuration, although the soul is asked, not to shudder. The second recitative is similar to the first, ending on the last word "erscheinet", "appeareth" in "when God's true loyal will appeareth". In the last aria, a duet, the strings are still silent, flute and oboe accompany the voices. The instruments begin with a ritornello, a trio with the continuo. After a first vocal section, a second section presents new material, but refers to the first section by a repeat of instrumental motifs from the first section and a complete repeat of the ritornello as a conclusion. The closing chorale is set for four parts.

Although originally scored for four vocal soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass), a four-part choir, horn, flauto traverso, oboe d'amore, two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Aria: "Mein Jesu, ziehe mich nach dir" (BWV 22 No 2) for Flute, Oboe & Cello

3 parts3 pages06:413 years ago465 views
Flute, Oboe, Cello
Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe (Jesus gathered the twelve to Himself), BWV 22,[a] is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach composed for Quinquagesima, the last Sunday before Lent. Bach composed it as an audition piece for the position of Thomaskantor in Leipzig and first performed it there on 7 February 1723.

The work, which is in five movements, begins with a scene from the Gospel reading in which Jesus predicts his suffering in Jerusalem. The unknown poet of the cantata text took the scene as a starting point for a sequence of aria, recitative, and aria, in which the contemporary Christian takes the place of the disciples, who do not understand what Jesus is telling them about the events soon to unfold, but follow him nevertheless. The closing chorale is a stanza from Elisabeth Cruciger's hymn "Herr Christ, der einig Gotts Sohn". The music is scored for three vocal soloists, a four-part choir, oboe, strings and continuo. The work shows that Bach had mastered the composition of a dramatic scene, an expressive aria with obbligato oboe, a recitative with strings, an exuberant dance, and a chorale in the style of his predecessor in the position as Thomaskantor, Johann Kuhnau. Bach directed the first performance of the cantata during a church service, together with another audition piece, Du wahrer Gott und Davids Sohn, BWV 23. He performed the cantata again on the last Sunday before Lent a year later, after he had taken up office.

The cantata shows elements which became standards for Bach's Leipzig cantatas and even the Passions, including a "frame of biblical text and chorale around the operatic forms of aria and recitative", "the fugal setting of biblical words" and "the biblical narrative ... as a dramatic scena".

The cantata has five movements and is scored for three vocal soloists (an alto (A), tenor (T) and bass (B)), a four-part choir (SATB), and for a Baroque orchestra of an oboe (Ob), two violins (Vl), viola (Va) and basso continuo. The duration is given as c.?20 minutes.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_nahm_zu_sich_die_Zw%C3%B6lfe,_BWV_22).

In this, the first aria, the alto voice is accompanied by an obbligato oboe, which expressively intensifies the text. In this aria, an individual believer requests Jesus to make him follow, even without comprehending where and why. Mincham observes a mood or affekt of "deep involvement and pensive commitment", with the oboe creating "an aura of suffering and a sense of struggling and reaching upwards in search of something indefinable in a way that only music can suggest.

I created this arrangement of the opening Aria: "Mein Jesu, ziehe mich, so werd ich laufen" (My Jesus, draw me, then I will run) for Flute, Oboe & Cello.

Chorale: "Wenn soll es doch geschehen" (BWV 11 No 11) For Small Orchestra

17 parts27 pages04:242 years ago462 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen (Laud to God in all his kingdoms), BWV 11,[a] known as the Ascension Oratorio (Himmelfahrtsoratorium), is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach, marked by him as Oratorium In Festo Ascensionis Xsti (Oratorio for the feast of the Ascension of Christ), probably composed in 1735 for the service for Ascension and first performed on 19 May 1735.

Bach had composed his Christmas Oratorio, based on the gospels of Luke and Matthew, in 1734, a work in six parts to be performed on six occasions during Christmas tide. He had composed an Easter Oratorio already in 1725. The Ascension Oratorio appeared thus in the same liturgical year as the Christmas Oratorio. The text for the Ascension Oratorio, a compilation of several biblical sources, free poetry and chorales, was presumably written by Picander who had written the libretti for the St Matthew Passion and the Christmas Oratorio, among others. It follows the story of the Ascension as told in Luke, Mark and the Acts of the Apostles.

The bible narration is compiled from multiple sources: the first recitative of the Evangelist (movement 2) is from Luke 24:50–51, the second (5) from Acts 1:9 and Mark 16:19, the third (7) from Acts 1:10–11, the last (9) from Luke 24:52a, Acts 1:12 and Luke 24:52b. The biblical words are narrated by the tenor as the Evangelist. In his third recitative two men are quoted, for this quotation tenor and bass both sing in an Arioso.

Part I, which tells of the Ascension, is concluded by the fourth stanza of Johann Rist's hymn "Du Lebensfürst, Herr Jesu Christ" in a four part setting. Part II reflects the reaction of the disciples. The closing chorale on the seventh stanza of Gottfried Wilhelm Sacer's "Gott fähret auf gen Himmel" is set as a chorale fantasia. While the music for the narration and the first chorale were new compositions in 1735, Bach based the framing choral movements and the two arias on earlier compositions. He used the model for the alto aria again much later for the Agnus Dei of his Mass in B minor.

In the first complete edition of Bach's works, the Bach-Ausgabe of the Bach Gesellschaft, the work was included under the cantatas (hence its low BWV number), and in the Bach Compendium it is numbered BC D 9 and included under oratorios.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobet_Gott_in_seinen_Reichen,_BWV_11).

The closing chorale, "Wenn soll es doch geschehen" (When shall it happen"), is the seventh stanza of "Gott fähret auf gen Himmel", written in 1697 by Gottfried Wilhelm Sacer. Set in the first person, it expresses the desire of the speaker for the "liebe Zeit" (dear time) when he sees the Saviour in his glory. Continuing saying "wir" (we), he imagines to greet him and kiss him. It is set as a chorale fantasia. The soprano sings the cantus firmus in long notes, on the melody of "Von Gott will ich nicht lassen". Similar to the final chorale Nun seid ihr wohl gerochen of the Christmas Oratorio, the chorale tune in a church mode appears in the triumphant context of a different major key. The text expresses longing for the day of being united with Jesus in Heaven. The musicologist Julian Mincham interprets the mode of the tune as "the human state of waiting and hoping", while the concerto represents the fulfillment. Mincham compares the writing to the opening chorale fantasias of the second cantata cycle of chorale cantatas, finding the composition for the lower voices "endlessly inventive, frequently related to the textual images" pointing out "the passionate and clinging representation of kissing the Saviour beneath the caressing flutes, in the penultimate phrase"

I created this arrangement of the closing Chorale: "Wenn soll es doch geschehen" (When shall it happen) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb Clarinets, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola, cello & Bass).

"Cum Sancto Spiritu" from the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232 No. 12) for Small Orchestra

16 parts31 pages04:332 years ago465 views
Trumpet(3), Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Mass in B minor (BWV 232) by Johann Sebastian Bach is a musical setting of the complete Ordinary of the Latin Mass. The work was one of Bach's last compositions, not completed until 1749, the year before his death. Much of the Mass gave new form to vocal music that Bach had composed throughout his career, dating back (in the case of the "Crucifixus") to 1714, but extensively revised. To complete the work, in the late 1740s Bach composed new sections of the Credo such as "Et incarnatus est".

It was unusual for composers working in the Lutheran tradition to compose a Missa tota and Bach's motivations remain a matter of scholarly debate. The Mass was never performed in its entirety during Bach's lifetime; the first documented complete performance took place in 1859. Since the nineteenth century it has been widely hailed as one of the greatest compositions in musical history, and today it is frequently performed and recorded. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach archived this work as the Great Catholic Mass.

On 1 February 1733, Augustus II Strong, Polish King, Grand Duke of Lithuania and Elector of Saxony, died. Five months of mourning followed, during which all public music-making was suspended. Bach used the opportunity to work on the composition of a Missa, a portion of the liturgy sung in Latin and common to both the Lutheran and Roman Catholic rites. His aim was to dedicate the work to the new sovereign Augustus III, a Catholic, with the hope of obtaining the title "Electoral Saxon Court Composer”. Upon its completion, Bach visited Augustus III and presented him with a copy of the Missa, together with a petition to be given a court title, dated July 27, 1733; in the accompanying inscription on the wrapper of the mass he complains that he had "innocently suffered one injury or another” in Leipzig. The petition did not meet with immediate success, but Bach eventually got his title: he was made court composer to Augustus III in 1736.

In the last years of his life, Bach expanded the Missa into a complete setting of the Latin Ordinary. It is not known what prompted this creative effort. Wolfgang Osthoff and other scholars have suggested that Bach intended the completed Mass in B minor for performance at the dedication of the new Hofkirche in Dresden, which was begun in 1738 and was nearing completion by the late 1740s. However, the building was not completed until 1751, and Bach's death in July, 1750 prevented his Mass from being submitted for use at the dedication. Instead, Johann Adolph Hasse's Mass in D minor was performed, a work with many similarities to Bach's Mass (the Credo movements in both works feature chant over a walking bass line, for example). Other explanations are less event-specific, involving Bach's interest in 'encyclopedic' projects (like The Art of Fugue) that display a wide range of styles, and Bach's desire to preserve some of his best vocal music in a format with wider potential future use than the church cantatas they originated in.

The piece is orchestrated for two flutes, two oboes d'amore, one natural horn (in D), three natural trumpets (in D), timpani, violins I and II, violas and basso continuo (cellos, basses, bassoons, organ and harpsichord).

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_B_minor).

I created this arrangement of the "Cum Sancto Spiritu in gloria Dei Patris" (With the Holy Spirit in the glory of God the Father) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flutes, Oboes, Bb Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

"Christo Resurgenti" for Piano & Clarinet Trio

4 parts3 pages026 years ago462 views
François Couperin (1668-1733) was certainly the greatest of the French claveinists and surely one of the greatest of French composers. Musically, Francois Couperin bridged two eras, the Baroque and the Classical, to which many of his ideas look forward. He was born in Paris into a family with a musical tradition stretching back 200 years. Their church, St Gervais, employed a member of the Couperin family as organist for an unbroken period of 173 years.

Little is know about this Easter Motet "Christo Resurgenti" (Christ Rising), although originally written for voices (2 Sopranos) and Basso Continuo. I created this arrangement for Clarinet Trio (2 Bb Clarinets and Bass Clarinet) and Acoustic Piano and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) and using the Clarinet soundfont from SoundFont Downloads at (http://www.soundfontdownloads.com).

Chorus: "Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben" (BWV 248 No 54) for Small Orchestra

14 parts28 pages04:523 years ago464 views
Trumpet(3), Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio).

I created this arrangement of the Chorus: "Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben” (Lord, when our proud enemies snarl) for Small Orchestra (Piccolo Trumpet, Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, English Horn, French Horn, Bassoon, Timpani, 2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Prelude & Fugue in E Minor (BWV 548) for Brass Quartet

4 parts31 pages14:552 years ago461 views
Trumpet(2), French Horn, Tuba
This massive work, requiring a good 15 minutes in performance, is one of Bach's most important and flamboyant organ compositions. Unlike most of his other preludes and fugues, this one seems to be a mature work written after Bach settled in Leipzig in 1723. Unexpectedly, it's the prelude that displays the most severe musical architecture, while the fugue is comparatively freewheeling (and harder to play). The grand prelude is cast in a verse and refrain structure, but employs three related thematic elements -- two for the verses. The refrain initially arches across 18 bars of the score; after the first verse, it returns in the dominant, establishing the tonality for the second verse. Here, Bach introduces the third theme, a dotted figure linked to the themes of both the refrain and the first verse. After this second verse, the refrain returns, modulating into the subdominant, where the third verse develops the themes presented in the first two. The refrain returns one last time; under the influence of the dominant pedal note that introduces it, the refrain avoids returning to the tonic until its very last chord. Despite its strict melodic structure, the prelude is a great harmonic adventure.

Now comes the fugue, which manages to fall into ternary form while following the usual fugal conventions. The first of the three sections is a self-contained fugue, complete with its own exposition, modulations, and episodes. The fugue theme is something of a chromatic wedge expanding around a tonic point, this wedge giving the work its nickname. The theme picks up two chromatic countersubjects during the first exposition. After the harmonic tension and surprise of this first section, the fugue's second section settles into the principal key. This portion is a 100-measure toccata, full of extremely virtuosic runs. The fugue theme pops up now and then and is also echoed in the pedal material, but doesn't fully reassert itself until the third panel of this triptych, which until near the end is a note-for-note repetition of the first section. The work ends, however, in a resplendent Picardy third, concluding this otherwise minor-mode fugue in a blaze of E major.

Source: Allmusic (http://www.allmusic.com/composition/prelude-and-fugue-for-organ-in-e-minor-wedge-bwv-548-bc-j19-mc0002403199).

Although originally composed for Organ, I created this modern interpretation for Brass Quartet (Bb Trumpet, Flugelhorn, French Horn & F Tuba).

Aria: "Son Imbrogliato io Già" for Horn & Strings

5 parts5 pages04:385 years ago460 views
Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710 – 1736) was an Italian composer, violinist and organist born at Iesi, Pergolesi and studied music there under a local musician, Francesco Santini. In 1725 he travelled to Naples where he studied under Gaetano Greco and Francesco Feo among others. He spent most of his brief life working for aristocratic patrons like the Colonna principe di Stigliano, and duca Marzio IV Maddaloni Carafa.

"La Serva Padrona" (The Servant Turned Mistress) is an opera buffa by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710 – 1736) to a libretto by Gennaro Antonio Federico, after the play by Jacopo Angello Nelli. The opera is only 45 minutes long and was originally performed as an intermezzo between the acts of a larger serious opera. It was originally an intermezzo to Pergolesi's opera seria, Il prigionier superbo (The Proud Prisoner). The two were premiered on 5 September 1733, the first performance after an earthquake in Naples had caused all theatres to be closed, and celebrated the birthday of the Empress of Habsburg.

“Son imbrogliato io già” (“I am all perplexed”) is a recitative and aria that takes place at the end of the opera after Serpina has told Uberto that she is engaged to be married. It is here that Uberto discovers his true feelings for Serpina. The recitative is written in two styles. The first is simple recitative where the characters sing only with a subtle accompaniment in the piano. You will notice that the accompaniment has very little movement using chords only to support the singer with some tonality. The second style is recitative has more movement and can be heard in the accompaniment through rapid notes.

Although originally written for solo voice (bass), viol & continuo, I created this arrangement for French Horn & string Quartet (Violin, Viola, Cello & Bass) and it is best played using the "GeneralUser GS.sf2" Soundfont by S. Christian Collins Software (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php).

Sarabande from the French Suite No. 5 in G Major (BWV 816 No. 3) for Oboe & Guitar

2 parts2 pages04:152 years ago463 views
Oboe, Guitar
The French Suites, BWV 812–817, are six suites which Johann Sebastian Bach wrote for the clavier (harpsichord or clavichord) between the years of 1722 and 1725. Although Suites 1–4 are typically dated to 1722, it is possible that the first was written somewhat earlier.

The suites were later given the name 'French' (first recorded usage by Friedrich Wilhelm Marpurg in 1762). Likewise, the English Suites received a later appellation. The name was popularised by Bach's biographer Johann Nikolaus Forkel, who wrote in his 1802 biography of Bach, "One usually calls them French Suites because they are written in the French manner." This claim, however, is inaccurate: like Bach's other suites, they follow a largely Italian convention. There is no surviving definitive manuscript of these suites, and ornamentation varies both in type and in degree across manuscripts. The Courantes of the first (in D minor) and third (in B minor) suites are in the French style, the Courantes of the other four suites are all in the Italian style. In any case Bach also employed dance movements (such as the Polonaise of the Sixth suite) that are foreign to the French manner. Usually, the swift second movement after the Allemande is named either Courante (French style) or Corrente (Italian style), but in all these suites the second movements are named Courante, according to the Bach catalog listing, which supports the suggestion that these suites are "French". Some of the manuscripts that have come down to us are titled "Suites Pour Le Clavecin", which is what probably led to the tradition of calling them "French" Suites.

Two additional suites, one in A minor (BWV 818), the other in E-flat Major (BWV 819), are linked to the familiar six in some manuscripts. The Overture in the French style, BWV 831, which Bach published as the second part of Clavier-Übung, is a suite in the French style but not connected to the French suites. Some manuscripts have movements not found in other copies, which are probably spurious.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Suites_(Bach)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Sarabande from the French Suite No. 5 in G Major (BWV 816 No. 3) for Oboe & Guitar.

Sinfonia No. 2 in C Minor (BWV 788) for String Trio

3 parts2 pages03:142 years ago461 views
The Inventions and Sinfonias, BWV 772–801, also known as the Two- and Three-Part Inventions, are a collection of thirty short keyboard compositions by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750): 15 inventions, which are two-part contrapuntal pieces, and 15 sinfonias, which are three-part contrapuntal pieces. They were originally written as musical exercises for his students.

Bach titled the collection: "Honest method, by which the amateurs of the keyboard – especially, however, those desirous of learning – are shown a clear way not only (1) to learn to play cleanly in two parts, but also, after further progress, (2) to handle three obligate parts correctly and well; and along with this not only to obtain good inventions (ideas) but to develop the same well; above all, however, to achieve a cantabile style in playing and at the same time acquire a strong foretaste of composition."

The two groups of pieces are both arranged in order of ascending key, each group covering eight major and seven minor keys and were composed in Köthen; the sinfonias, on the other hand, were probably not finished until the beginning of the Leipzig period.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inventions_and_Sinfonias_(Bach)).

Although originally composed for Harpsichord, I created this arrangement of the Sinfonia No. 2 in C Minor (BWV 788) for String Trio (Violin, Viola & Cello).
Chorus: "Du Hirte Israel, höre" (BWV 104 No 1) for String Orchestra
Video

Chorus: "Du Hirte Israel, höre" (BWV 104 No 1) for String Orchestra

7 parts12 pages03:084 years ago460 views
Violin(4), Viola(2), Cello
Du Hirte Israel, höre (You Shepherd of Israel, hear), BWV 104, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it for the second Sunday after Easter in Leipzig and first performed it on 23 April 1724.

Bach composed the cantata in his first annual cycle in Leipzig for the second Sunday after Easter, called Misericordias Domini, and first performed it on 23 April 1724.

The prescribed readings for that Sunday were from the First Epistle of Peter, Christ as a model (1 Peter 2:21–25), and from the Gospel of John, the Good Shepherd (John 10:11–16). The unknown poet begins with Psalms 80:2 and ends with Cornelius Becker's hymn "Der Herr ist mein getreuer Hirt", a paraphrase of Psalm 23 (1598). The poet refers in his work to more Bible context, such as Lamentations 3:23–25 and 1 Corinthians 10:13 for the first recitative, reflecting that God as the Good Shepherd will take care. In the second recitative, he concludes: "Only gather, o good Shepherd, us poor and erring ones; ah, let our journey soon reach an end and lead us into your sheepfold!" The last aria hopes "for faith's reward after a gentle sleep of death" (John 10:11–16, des Glaubens Lohn nach einem sanften Todesschlafe), combining the Baroque ideas of pastoral peace and longing for death.


Bach referred to the Pastorale aspect of the text in his music. In the opening chorus three oboes on the firm ground of extended pedal point create pastoral sounds, in triplets which are frequently associated with shepherds, such as in the Sinfonia opening Part II of Bach's Christmas Oratorio. The choir sings alternating homophonic calls, "höre!" (listen!) and "erscheine!" (appear!), and two fugues on the image of Joseph leading his flocks. The fugue subject is the same in both fugues, but the second time the voices enter from the lowest voice to the highest, culminating in an ultimate third section of the calls. Different from the normal setting, the instrumental introduction is not repeated after this climax.

The first recitative leads to an arioso part on the final Bible quotation "Gott ist getreu" (God is faithful). The tenor aria is accompanied by two oboes d'amore. In the bass aria, instrumentation, triplets and extended pedal points are reminiscent of the opening chorus. The closing choral is a four-part setting on the tune of "Allein Gott in der Höh sei Ehr".

Although originally scored for tenor and bass soloists, a four-part choir, two oboes d'amore, taille (tenor oboe), two violins, viola and basso continuo, I created this arrangement for String Orchestra (1st Violins, 2nd Violins, Violas & Cellos).

Aria: "Erleucht' auch meine finstre Sinnen" (BWV 248 No 47) for Oboe, Horn & Cello

3 parts6 pages04:104 years ago460 views
Oboe, French Horn, Cello
The Christmas Oratorio BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach's autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

It was conceived as a set of six cantatas. Unlike the Passion settings and the oratorios of Bach's exact contemporary Handel, the six parts of his Christmas Oratorio were performed on separate days. Bach wrote the six cantatas to celebrate the whole period of the Christmas festivities of 1734-35, starting with Part I on Christmas Day, and ending with Part VI on Epiphany (January 6th). The performances were divided between his two churches: Parts I, II, IV and VI were given at the Thomaskirche, and Parts III and V at the Nicolaikirche.

Bach wrote the Christmas Oratorio over a short period. Unusually for him, but perhaps by necessity, he recycled music from earlier compositions. At least eleven sections have been identified as coming from three earlier secular cantatas, with Bach working with his frequent collaborator Picander to alter the texts for their new use. It is thought that several more sections may be based on lost sacred works, including the documented but now lost St Mark Passion. Bach also composed new music for much of the piece, including all of the recitatives and chorales.

This is my arrangement of the Bass Aria 'Erleucht auch meine finstre Sinnen' ('Illumine my dark thoughts as well') and is arranged here for Oboe, French Horn & Cello.

Aria: "Ich halt es mit dem lieben Gott" (BWV 52 No 5) for Viola & Strings

5 parts7 pages04:154 years ago459 views
Guitar, Strings(4)
Falsche Welt, dir trau ich nicht (False world, I don't trust you), BWV 52, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the solo cantata for soprano in Leipzig for the 23rd Sunday after Trinity and it was first performed on 24 November 1726.

Bach composed the cantata, a solo cantata for a soprano, in 1726 in Leipzig for the 23rd Sunday after Trinity. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Philippians, "our conversation is in heaven" (Philippians 3:17–21), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the question about paying taxes, answered by "Render unto Caesar..." (Matthew 22:15–22). The unknown poet takes from the gospel the idea that the world is false and that man should concentrate on God. He refers to the murder of Abner by Joab, described in 2 Samuel 3:27, as an example for the world's falseness. The closing chorale is the first verse of Adam Reusner's "In dich hab ich gehoffet, Herr" (1533). The beginning line is the last idea of the "Te Deum". Bach used verse 4 of the chorale, "Mir hat die Welt trüglich gericht't", in his St Matthew Passion.

The cantata is set for just one singer, but the instrumentation is rich. Similar to other cantatas of the later Leipzig period, Bach used an instrumental movement from an earlier period as a sinfonia, in this case the opening movement of his first Brandenburg Concerto, dominated by horns and oboes, in its early version without a violino piccolo. In the first aria the soprano is accompanied by two violins, in the second aria of dance character, by three oboes.

The two horns of the sinfonia return in the closing chorale, horn 1 supporting the soprano, horn 2 playing a fifth part.

The cantata in six movements is scored for a soprano soloist, a four-part choir (only for the final chorale), two horns, three oboes, bassoon, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsche_Welt,_dir_trau_ich_nicht,_BWV_52).

I created this arrangement of the second Aria: "Ich halt es mit dem lieben Gott" (I keep faith with the loving God) for Solo Viola & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Courante in G Major (TWV 32:13/BWV 840) for Viola & Guitar

2 parts1 page01:52a year ago460 views
Viola, Guitar
Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although he did not introduce new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an unrivalled control of harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France.

The Suites and suite movements (BWV 832–845) are a miscellaneous collections of suites (partitas) and miscellaneous movements of authentic and spurious works.

The Courante in G Major (BWV 840) is taken from the Notebook for Wilhelm Friedemann Bach: 'Klavierbüchlein für Wilhelm Friedemann Bach' (1720) and was later determined to be the work of Georg Phillipp Telemann (TWV 32:13).

Source: IMSLP (http://imslp.org/wiki/Suites_and_suite_movements,_BWV_832%E2%80%93845_(Bach,_Johann_Sebastian)).

Although originally written for Harpsichord. I created this Arrangement of the Courante in G Major (TWV 32:13/BWV 840) for Viola & Guitar.

"L'âme Évaporée" (L. 79) for Oboe & Harp

2 parts2 pages01:382 years ago459 views
Oboe, Harp
Claude Debussy (born Achille-Claude Debussy) was among the most influential composers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His mature compositions, distinctive and appealing, combined modernism and sensuality so successfully that their sheer beauty often obscures their technical innovation. Debussy is considered the founder and leading exponent of musical Impressionism (although he resisted the label), and his adoption of non-traditional scales and tonal structures was paradigmatic for many composers who followed.

The son of a shopkeeper and a seamstress, Debussy began piano studies at the Paris Conservatory at the age of 11. While a student there, he encountered the wealthy Nadezhda von Meck (most famous as Tchaikovsky's patroness), who employed him as a music teacher to her children; through travel, concerts and acquaintances, she provided him with a wealth of musical experience. Most importantly, she exposed the young Debussy to the works of Russian composers, such as Borodin and Mussorgsky, who would remain important influences on his music.

Debussy began composition studies in 1880, and in 1884 he won the prestigious Prix de Rome with his cantata L'enfant prodigue. This prize financed two years of further study in Rome—years that proved to be creatively frustrating. However, the period immediately following was fertile for the young composer; trips to Bayreuth and the Paris World Exhibition (1889) established, respectively, his determination to move away from the influence of Richard Wagner, and his interest in the music of Eastern cultures.

After a relatively bohemian period, during which Debussy formed friendships with many leading Parisian writers and musicians (not least of which were Mallarmé, Satie, and Chausson), the year 1894 saw the enormously successful premiere of his Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun)—a truly revolutionary work that brought his mature compositional voice into focus. His seminal opera Pelléas et Mélisande, completed the next year, would become a sensation at its first performance in 1902. The impact of those two works earned Debussy widespread recognition (as well as frequent attacks from critics, who failed to appreciate his forward-looking style), and over the first decade of the twentieth century he established himself as the leading figure in French music—so much so that the term "Debussysme" ("Debussyism"), used both positively and pejoratively, became fashionable in Paris. Debussy spent his remaining healthy years immersed in French musical society, writing as a critic, composing, and performing his own works internationally. He succumbed to colon cancer in 1918, having also suffered a deep depression brought on by the onset of World War I.

Debussy's personal life was punctuated by unfortunate incidents, most famously the attempted suicide of his first wife, Lilly Texier, whom he abandoned for the singer Emma Bardac. However, his subsequent marriage to Bardac, and their daughter Claude-Emma, whom they called "Chouchou" and who became the dedicatee of the composer's Children's Corner piano suite, provided the middle-aged Debussy with great personal joys.

Debussy wrote successfully in most every genre, adapting his distinctive compositional language to the demands of each. His orchestral works, of which Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune and La mer (The Sea, 1905) are most familiar, established him as a master of instrumental color and texture. It is this attention to tone color—his layering of sound upon sound so that they blend to form a greater, evocative whole—that linked Debussy in the public mind to the Impressionist painters.

"L'âme Évaporée", is from Deux Romances (2 Romances), and was composed in June of 1885 and later published in December 1891. This overwhelming melody is based on a poem by Paul Bourget (1852-1935), extracted from Confessions (1882).

Although this work was originally written for Piano and Solo Voice (Chant), I created this arrangement for Oboe & Concert (Pedal) Harp