HWV 56 (oratorio) Messiah

HWV56N01 Overture in e minor - Messiah

13 parts6 pages04:475 months ago43 views
Oboe(2), Bassoon(2), Strings(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Bass(2), Harpsichord(2)
Messiah (which should NOT have "The" in front of it) was written in the fall of 1741, but was not performed until the spring of 1742, in the city of Dublin, Ireland. It was a hit. I have added hidden tracks with oboes and bassoons as was common practice for Handel for performances in his day. I have also striven to use tempos more like the composer intended rather than those used by modern "race track" conductors.

HWV56N03 Messiah "Every valley shall be exalted"

11 parts16 pages04:404 months ago27 views
Oboe, Bassoon(3), Strings(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
This aria (air) for tenor in E Major is number 3 in the 1741 oratorio "Messiah" by George F. Handel. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. It was composed in the fall of 1741, but not performed until the spring of 1742, in Dublin, Ireland. It was a hit and and has remained popular ever since, although his operas quickly fell into oblivion It is surely the most famous of all oratorios ever composed. For mor inforation on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N04 - Messiah - And the Glory of the Lord
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HWV56N04 - Messiah - And the Glory of the Lord

14 parts21 pages04:364 months ago57 views
Oboe, Bassoon(2), Strings(3), Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Piano, Keyboard
This chorus in A Major is number 4 in the 1741 oratorio "Messiah" by George F. Handel. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. It was composed in the fall of 1741, but not performed until the spring of 1742, in Dublin, Ireland. It was a hit and and has remained popular ever since, although his operas quickly fell into oblivion It is surely the most famous of all oratorios ever composed. For mor inforation on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N05Y1741 - Messiah - Thus saith the Lord
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HWV56N05Y1741 - Messiah - Thus saith the Lord

8 parts6 pages01:434 months ago13 views
Strings(2), Viola, Bassoon, Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
This accompianato for Bass is number 5 from the oratorio, "Messiah." (notice the absence of the word "the"), HWV 56, as originally composed in the fall of 1741. By the spring of 1742, Handel had change his mind about the first five measures and crossed them off in the autograph. He replaced them with a new introduction, leaving the rest of the number the same. Since this change was made before the first performance in 1742, the 1742 version has been used almost all the time. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. For more inforation on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N05Y1742 - Mesiah - Thus saith the Lord
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HWV56N05Y1742 - Mesiah - Thus saith the Lord

8 parts5 pages01:444 months ago14 views
Strings(2), Viola(2), Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 5 from the oratorio, "Messiah" (notice the absence of "the") by George F. Handel. This is what has always usually been heard since the first performance in Dublin, Ireland, in 1742, although an earlier version exists from 1741 in the autograph. By the spring of 1742, Handel had change his mind about the first five measures and crossed them off in the autograph. He replaced them with a new introduction, leaving the rest of the number the same. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. For more inforation on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)

HWV56N06Y1741 - Messiah - But who may abide?

9 parts9 pages03:474 months ago18 views
Strings(2), Viola(2), Cello(2), Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
This aria for bass in d minor is the original form of Number 6 from the Oratorio, "Messiah" as composed in the fall of 1741. It is the form of number 6 that was most often performed under Handel's direction. However, later in Handel's life he composed several different settings for higher voices with a now famous presstissimo section. In 1789, thirty years after Handel's death in 1759, Mozart made an arrangement of this oratorio, now known as K. 572. Mozart bassed his version on the version Handel wrote for alto, but assigned the vocal part for bass. Mozart's example was followed well into the 20th century with a bass for a soloist, but using various orchestrations for the accompaniment. The version presented here has rarely been heard since Mozart's time. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)

HWV56N06Y1789 - Messiah - But who may abide?

8 parts19 pages05:244 months ago31 views
Strings(3), Viola(2), Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord
This number takes some explanation. No one ever heard this aria performed like this in Handel's lifetime. I have already posted the original form of Number 6 from the Oratorio, "Messiah" as composed in the fall of 1741. It is the form of number 6 that was most often performed under Handel's direction. However, later in Handel's life he composed several different settings for higher voices with a now famous presstissimo section. In 1789, thirty years after Handel's death in 1759, Mozart made an arrangement of this oratorio, now known as K. 572. Mozart bassed his version on the version Handel wrote for alto, but assigned the vocal part for bass. Mozart's example was followed well into the 20th century with a bass for a soloist, but using various orchestrations for the accompaniment. For example, all performances based on the 1912 vocal score printed by Schirmer follow this plan, and that includes a very large number of performances by amateur groups and church choirs. I had the pleasure of singing this as bass soloist with the Marshall (MO) Community Chorus several times. Performances by professionals, including commercially produced CD and vinyl recording since later in the 20th century, however, have mostly gone back to Handel's version with an alto soloist. The libretto for this oritorio was by Charles Jennens. Ever since Handel's lifetime, this has been the world's most famous oratorio and is often performed. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)

HWV56N07 - Messiah - And He shall purify

11 parts18 pages03:134 months ago22 views
Strings(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
this chorus in g minor is from part one of the oratorio, "Messiah," HWV 56, composed by George F. Handel in 1741. The libretto for this oritorio was by Charles Jennens. Ever since Handel's lifetime, this has been the world's most famous oratorio and is often performed. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)

HWV56N08 Messiah: Behold, a virgin shall conceive

5 parts1 page00:144 months ago10 views
Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Recitavo secco for alto from part one of the oratorio, "Messiah,"HWV 56, composed in 1741 by George F. Handel. The libretto for this oritorio was by Charles Jennens. Ever since Handel's lifetime, this has been the world's most famous oratorio and is often performed. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N09 Messiah O Thou that tellest good tidings
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HWV56N09 Messiah O Thou that tellest good tidings

11 parts12 pages07:314 months ago24 views
Strings, Viola, Voice(3), Flute, Cello(2), Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 9 is an alto aria with chorus. "Messiah," HWV 56, was composed in 1741 by George F. Handel. The libretto for this oritorio was by Charles Jennens. Ever since Handel's lifetime, this has been the world's most famous oratorio and is often performed. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)

HWV56N10 Behold, darkness shall cover the earth

8 parts5 pages02:474 months ago18 views
Number 10 is a bass accompagnato in b minor from part one of the oratorio, "Messiah,"HWV 56, composed in 1741 by George F. Handel. I performed this as bass soloist with the West Plains (MO) community chorus in 1988. The libretto for this oratorio was by Charles Jennens. Ever since Handel's lifetime, this has been the world's most famous oratorio and is often performed. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)

HWV56N11 The people that walked in darkness

6 parts4 pages03:324 months ago10 views
Number 11 is a bass aria in b minor from part one of the oratorio, "Messiah,"HWV 56, composed in 1741 by George F. Handel. I performed this as bass soloist with the West Plains (MO) community chorus in 1988. The libretto for this oratorio was by Charles Jennens. Ever since Handel's lifetime, this has been the world's most famous oratorio and is often performed. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N21 - His yolk is easy and his burthen is light
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HWV56N21 - His yolk is easy and his burthen is light

12 parts14 pages02:294 months ago21 views
Violin(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Piano(2), Harpsichord
Number 21 is the end of part one of "Messiah." HWV 56, composed by George F. Handel in 1741. The libretto for this oritorio was by Charles Jennens. Ever since Handel's lifetime, this has been the world's most famous oratorio and is often performed. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N22 - Behold the Lamb of God!
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HWV56N22 - Behold the Lamb of God!

11 parts10 pages03:174 months ago13 views
Strings(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 22 is the begining of part 2 of "Messiah," HWV 56, 1741, Composed by George F. Handel. The libretto is by Charles Jennings. This is slower than most modern conductors take it, but it is, after all, marked "Largo." For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N23 - Alto - He was despisèd and rejected
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HWV56N23 - Alto - He was despisèd and rejected

9 parts9 pages10:334 months ago66 views
Violin(2), Viola(2), Cello, Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar, Harpsichord
This aria da capo in E-Flat Major was written for "Messiah," HWV 56, 1741, Composed by George F. Handel. The libretto is by Charles Jennings. If you have jeux14.sf2, set "Harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o 16-8-4," otherwise set them to "recorder." For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N25 - And with His stripes we are healèd
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HWV56N25 - And with His stripes we are healèd

11 parts12 pages03:044 months ago19 views
Strings(3), Violin, Voice(4), Cello, Harmonica, Guitar
Number 25: Chorus in f minor (written with 3 flats), HWV 56, 1741. HWV 56 was written by George F. Handel to a libretto by Charles Jennens. If you have jeux14.sf2, set "Harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o 16-8-4," otherwise set them to "recorder." For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N24 - Surely He hath bourne our grief
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HWV56N24 - Surely He hath bourne our grief

12 parts10 pages02:534 months ago17 views
Strings(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar, Harpsichord
Number 24: Chorus in f minor (written with three flats), Messiah, 1741, HWV 56 was written by George F. Handel to a libretto by Charles Jennens. MuseScore is not particuarly designed for this kind of music! The rhythms are quite hard to type, at least for me. If you have jeux14.sf2, set "Harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o 16-8-4," otherwise set them to "recorder." For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N26 - All we like sheep have turnèd
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HWV56N26 - All we like sheep have turnèd

12 parts25 pages04:324 months ago16 views
Strings(3), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Harmonica, Guitar, Harpsichord
Number 26: chorus in F Major, but ending in f minor (written with one flat), was written by George F. Handel in 1741. HWV 56 was written by George F. Handel to a libretto by Charles Jennens. If you have jeux14.sf2, set "Harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o 16-8-4," otherwise set them to "recorder." For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N27 - All they that see him laugh him to scorn
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HWV56N27 - All they that see him laugh him to scorn

8 parts3 pages01:084 months ago13 views
Strings(3), Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar
Number 27: Tenor Accompagnato in b-flat minor (written with 3 flats) was written in 1741 by George F. Handel. HWV 56 was written by George F. Handel to a libretto by Charles Jennens. If you have jeux14.sf2, set "Harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o 16-8-4," otherwise set them to "recorder." For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N28 He trusted in God that He would deliver Him
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HWV56N28 He trusted in God that He would deliver Him

11 parts15 pages02:424 months ago11 views
Strings(4), Viola, Voice(4), Guitar(2)
Number 28: chorus in c minor was written in 1741 by George F. Handel for the oratorio, "Messiah," HWV 56. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. If you have jeux14.sf2, set "Harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o 16-8-4," otherwise set them to "recorder." For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)
HWV56N33 - Lift up your heads, O ye gates
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HWV56N33 - Lift up your heads, O ye gates

11 parts17 pages03:434 months ago14 views
Strings(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Guitar(2)
Number 33: chorus in F Major was written in 1741 for "Messiah," HWV 56, by George F. Handel. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) If you have jeux14.sf2, set "Harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o 16-8-4," otherwise set them to "recorder."
HWV56N34 - Unto which of the angles said he at any time
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HWV56N34 - Unto which of the angles said he at any time

5 parts1 page00:174 months ago10 views
Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar
Number 34: Tenor recitativo secco for Messiah, was written in the fall of 1741 for Messiah, HWV 56. If you download this and you have jeux14.sf2, set what will probably be listed as "harmonica" and "guitar" to "Fonds g.o. 8-4" and "Fonds g.o. 16-8." Otherwise, set them to "recorder." The libretto was written by Charles Jennens. For more information on this oratorio, please see " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) ."
HWV56N35 - Let all the angels of God worship him
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HWV56N35 - Let all the angels of God worship him

11 parts8 pages01:513 months ago10 views
Strings(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar
Number 35: chorus in D Major was written by George F. Handel in 1741 for Messiah, HWV 56. If you download this and you have jeux14.sf2, set what will probably be listed as "harmonica" and "guitar" to "Fonds g.o. 8-4" and "Fonds g.o. 16-8." Otherwise, set them to "recorder," or, if you prefer, to "Cembalo" or "Coupled cembalo." The libretto was written by Charles Jennens. For more information on this oratorio, please see " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) ."
HWV56N36 - Thou art gone up on high - 1741
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HWV56N36 - Thou art gone up on high - 1741

6 parts4 pages03:533 months ago4 views
Strings, Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 36: Original aria for bass in d minor, composed in 1741 for the oratorio, "Messiah" by George F. Handel. This is still probably the best known version of this aria, although it is often omitted in modern performances. The story goes that it was too difficult for the basses available to Handel in 1742 in Dublin, Ireland, so Handel wrote another version for contralto to be performed there. Another version was written for a castrato in 1749 and yet another was written for soprano in 1754. The libretto was by Charles Jennens For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .

HWV56N36 - Thou art gone up on high - 1742

6 parts5 pages03:383 months ago10 views
Strings, Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 36 (1742) Alto aria in d minor, Messiah, HWV 56 was written by George F. Handel. The story goes that the original bass version was too difficult for the basses available to Handel in 1742 in Dublin, Ireland, so Handel wrote another version for contralto to be performed there. Another version was written for a castrato in 1749 and yet another was written for soprano in 1754. The libretto was by Charles Jennens For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .
HWV56N38 - "How beautiful are the feet" - 1742
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HWV56N38 - "How beautiful are the feet" - 1742

8 parts3 pages02:243 months ago15 views
Strings, Flute, Cello(2), Harmonica, Guitar, Harpsichord, Contrabass
Number 38 (1742), Aria for soprano in g minor was written by George F. Handel in 1742. The libretto was by Charles Jennens. It leaves out the 'B' section, whose words were used for what is now known as number 39. For more about this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .
HWV56N38Z1 - How beautiful are the feet
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HWV56N38Z1 - How beautiful are the feet

9 parts2 pages01:183 months ago10 views
Strings(4), Oboe(2), Cello, Contrabass, Bass
Number 38 (Old Testament) Z1: Soprano and Alto duet in d minor, Messiah, HWV 56. Now things get really complicated. The idea was to substitute a similar old testament scripture for the text in number 38, thus necessitating a change in number 39 as well. This leaves a choice between this version and another duet, slightly longer, for number 38 and the text, "Break forth into joy" for number 39 instead of, "Their sound is gone out." see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) for more about this oratorio.
HWV56N38Z2 - How beautiful are the feet
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HWV56N38Z2 - How beautiful are the feet

10 parts2 pages01:173 months ago21 views
Strings(2), Viola, Flute, Oboe, Cello(2), Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 38 (Old Testament) Z 2: Duet for soprano and alto in d minor, Messiah. Like the preceding Old Testament version, This should be followed by "Break forth into Joy" as number 39. This also, like the preceding Old testament version, is seldom heard today. For more information on this oratorio, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel)

HWV56N39Z - Break forth into joy

12 parts21 pages02:463 months ago8 views
Strings(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello(2), Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 39 (Old Testament): chorus in F Major. This is rarely heard today, and should only be used with the Old Testament versions of number 38, which is to say those marked Old Testament above. Otherwise use "Their sound is gone out" as number 39, of which there are two versions, one for tenor (rarely used) and one for chorus (the usual choice). For more on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .

HWV56N39 - Their sound is gone out - (1743)

5 parts1 page01:083 months ago13 views
Viola, Cello, Contrabass, Harpsichord(2)
Number 39: tenor aria in F Major was used only in 1743 as far as I know. It became necessary when the original aria for soprano was shortened to just the 'A' section, leaving the text of the 'B' section to be handeled separately. It was replaced by the choral version in 1745 which is usually performed today. The librettist was Charles Jennens. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel).

HWV56N39 - Their Sound Is Gone Out - 1745

14 parts9 pages01:473 months ago8 views
Oboe(2), Strings(5), Voice(4), Bassoon, Harpsichord(2)
Number 39 (1745) chorus in E-Flat Major, Messiah, HWV 56. This is what is usually heard today. Yes, it would have been simpler to stick with the original soprano aria dal segno, but nobody asked me. It was written at the request of the librettist Charles Jennens who wanted a chorus to replace the tenor aria written in 1743 to replace the 'B' section when the original soprano aria dal segno was shortened to the 'A' section only. Notice how this contrasts to performances today when numbers are dropped without thought of what that does to the text. Even when an old testament scripture was introduced to replace the new testament text used here, the text was still complete. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .
HWV56N40 - Why do the nations? - with da capo repeat
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HWV56N40 - Why do the nations? - with da capo repeat

9 parts24 pages06:313 months ago7 views
Strings(2), Viola(2), Cello, Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar, Harpsichord
Number 40 as a bass aria da capo, Messiah, HWV 56. Although da capo does occur in the autograph, it has been crossed out. It has been recorded this way however. It is probably not the composer's intention. The libretto is by Charles Jennens. More on this oratorio may be found at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .
HWV56N44 - Hallelujah
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HWV56N44 - Hallelujah

14 parts22 pages04:053 months ago45 views
Trombone(2), Timpani, Strings(3), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Guitar(2)
Number 44: chorus in D Major, Messiah, HWV 56, 1741. Mozart changed the trumpets to horns because he could not find trumpet players capable of playing the high notes. I changed them to trombones in MuseScore because the default trumpets sound to thin on the high notes, in my opinion. Change them back if you prefer. Also, If you download this, please change the guitar and harmonica which is probably what you will get if you do not have Jeux14.sf2 installed as the second sound font. I suggest fonds g.o. 8-4 and fonds g.o. 16-8 for the organ if you have jeux14.sf2, recorder for both if you do not. The story of King George standing for this chorus may be appochryfal, but the practice is still regularly observed. The libretto for this oratorio is by Charles Jennens. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .
HWV56N52 - If God be for us, who can be against us?
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HWV56N52 - If God be for us, who can be against us?

8 parts11 pages04:573 months ago32 views
Strings, Flute, Cello(2), Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar, Harpsichord
Number 52: Soprano aria in g minor, Messiah, HWV 56, 1741. Libretto by Charles Jennens. If you download this, you will probably want to change "harmonica" and "guitar" to "fonds g.o. 8-4" and "fonds g.o. 16-8," if you have Jeux14.sf2 installed, but not in second place, both to "recorder" otherwise. In changing this from MIDI to MuseScore 2, I left the hand-written trills because they sound so much better. For more information on this oratorio, please see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) .
HWV56N37 - The Lord gave the word
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HWV56N37 - The Lord gave the word

11 parts9 pages01:363 months ago16 views
Strings(2), Viola, Voice(4), Cello, Contrabass, Harmonica, Guitar
Number 37 (1741): chorus in B-Flat Major for Messiah, HWV 56, was written by George F. Handel. If you download this and you have jeux14.sf2, set what will probably be listed as "harmonica" and "guitar" to "Fonds g.o. 8-4" and "Fonds g.o. 16-8." Otherwise, set them to "recorder," or, if you prefer, to "Cembalo" or "Coupled cembalo." The libretto was written by Charles Jennens. For more information on this oratorio, please see " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_(Handel) ."