Mazurka in G Minor (Opus 21) for Winds & Strings
Custom audio

Mazurka in G Minor (Opus 21) for Winds & Strings

8 parts9 pages03:2611 hours ago18 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies, concertos, songs, sacred and secular choral music, solo piano, and chamber music. He was generally not a pioneer, though he did help to revive some earlier and largely forgotten dance forms, like the bourée and gavotte. He was a conservative who wrote many popular scores scattered throughout the various genres: the Piano Concerto No. 2, Symphony No. 3 ("Organ"), the symphonic poem Danse macabre, the opera Samson et Dalila, and probably his most widely performed work, The Carnival of The Animals. While he remained a composer closely tied to tradition and traditional forms in his later years, he did develop a more arid style, less colorful and, in the end, less appealing. He was also a poet and playwright of some distinction.

Saint-Saëns was born in Paris on October 9, 1835. He was one of the most precocious musicians ever, beginning piano lessons with his aunt at two-and-a-half and composing his first work at three. At age seven he studied composition with Pierre Maledin. When he was ten, he gave a concert that included Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto, Mozart's B flat Concerto, K. 460, along with works by Bach, Handel, and Hummel. In his academic studies, he displayed the same genius, learning languages and advanced mathematics with ease and celerity. He would also develop keen, lifelong interests in geology and astronomy.

Curiously, after 1890, Saint-Saëns' music was regarded with some condescension in his homeland, while in England and the United States he was hailed as France's greatest living composer well into the twentieth century. Saint-Saëns experienced an especially triumphant concert tour when he visited the U.S. in 1915. In the last two decades of his life, he remained attached to his dogs and was largely a loner. He died in Algeria on December 16, 1921.

Source: Allmusic (http://www.allmusic.com/artist/camille-saint-sa%C3%ABns-mn0000688311/biography).

Although originally composed for piano, I created this interpretation for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Concerto in Bb Major (RV 167) for Winds & Strings
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Concerto in Bb Major (RV 167) for Winds & Strings

7 parts12 pages04:4617 hours ago14 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741) was an Italian Baroque musical composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher, and priest. Born in Venice, the capital of the Venetian Republic, he is regarded as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe. He composed many instrumental concertos, for the violin and a variety of other instruments, as well as sacred choral works and more than forty operas. His best-known work is a series of violin concertos known as the Four Seasons.

Details regarding Vivaldi's early life are few. His father was a violinist in the Catherdral of Venice's orchestra and probably Antonio's first teacher. There is much speculation about other teachers, such as Corelli, but no evidence to support this. Vivaldi studied for the priesthood as a young man and was ordained in 1703. He was known for much of his career as "il prete rosso" (the red-haired priest), but soon after his ordination he declined to take on his ecclesiastical duties. Later in life he cited ill health as the reason, but other motivations have been proposed; perhaps Vivaldi simply wanted to explore new opportunties as a composer. It didn't take him long. Landing a job as a violin teacher at a girls' orphanage in Venice (where he would work in one capacity or another during several stretches of his life), he published a set of trio sonatas and another of violin sonatas. Word of his abilities spread around Europe, and in 1711 an Amsterdam publisher brought out, under the title L'estro armonico (Harmonic Inspiration), a set of Vivaldi's concertos for one or more violins with orchestra. These were best sellers (it was this group of concertos that spurred Bach's transcriptions), and Vivaldi followed them up with several more equally successful concerto sets. Perhaps the most prolific of all the great European composers, he once boasted that he could compose a concerto faster than a copyist could ready the individual parts for the players in the orchestra. He began to compose operas, worked from 1718 to 1720 in the court of the German principality of Hessen-Darmstadt, and traveled in Austria and perhaps Bohemia. Throughout his career, he had his choice of commissions from nobility and the highest members of society, the ability to use the best performers, and enough business savvy to try to control the publication of his works, although due to his popularity, many were published without his consent. Later in life Vivaldi was plagued by rumors of a sexual liaison with one of his vocal students, and he was censured by ecclesiastical authorities. His Italian career on the rocks, he headed for Vienna. He died there and was buried as a pauper in 1741, although at the height of his career his publications had earned a comfortable living.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/antonio-vivaldi-mn0000685058/biography ).

Although originally created for Strings & Basso Continuo, I created this Arrangement of the Concerto in Bb Major (RV 167) for Winds (Flute, Oboe & Bb Clarinet) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Jacob Collier- Make Me Cry

2 parts11 pages03:40a day ago58 views
Synthesizer, Piano
MOBILE USERS\/ \/ \/ \/ \/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdE4rYfq8Xk

Hey!
This is my arrangement of 'Make Me Cry' for solo piano and voice, meant to be sung at piano.
The making of this was livestreamed at https://www.twitch.tv/gingerandidiut
You can see the video of the broadcast at https://www.twitch.tv/videos/414201656
Follow the account to know when I stream next!
Thank you all for listening!
"Missa Ave maris stella" for Woodwind Quartet
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"Missa Ave maris stella" for Woodwind Quartet

4 parts24 pages20:572 days ago19 views
Flute, Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon
Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548 – 1611) was the most famous composer in 16th-century Spain, and was one of the most important composers of the Counter-Reformation, along with Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina and Orlando di Lasso. Victoria was not only a composer, but also an accomplished organist and singer as well as a Catholic priest. However, he preferred the life of a composer to that of a performer.

Victoria was born in Sanchidrián in the province of Ávila, Castile around 1548 and died in 1611. Victoria's family can be traced back for generations. Not only are the names of the members in his immediate family known, but even the occupation of his grandfather. Victoria was the seventh of nine children born to Francisco Luis de Victoria and Francisca Suárez de la Concha. His mother was of converso descent. After his father's death in 1557, his uncle, Juan Luis, became his guardian. He was a choirboy in Ávila Cathedral. Cathedral records state that his uncle, Juan Luis, presented Victoria's Liber Primus to the Church while reminding them that Victoria had been brought up in the Ávila Cathedral. Because he was such an accomplished organist, many believe that he began studying the keyboard at an early age from a teacher in Ávila. Victoria most likely began studying "the classics" at St. Giles's, a boys' school in Ávila. This school was praised by St.Teresa of Avila and other highly regarded people of music.

He was a master at overlapping and dividing choirs with multiple parts with a gradual decreasing of rhythmic distance throughout. Not only does Victoria incorporate intricate parts for the voices, but the organ is almost treated like a soloist in many of his choral pieces. Victoria did not begin the development of psalm settings or antiphons for two choirs, but he continued and increased the popularity of such repertoire. Victoria reissued works that had been published previously, and included new revisions in each new issue.

Victoria published his first book of motets in 1572. In 1585 he wrote his Officium Hebdomadae Sanctae, a collection which included 37 pieces that are part of the Holy Week celebrations in the Catholic liturgy, including the eighteen motets of the Tenebrae Responsories.

Stylistically, his music shuns the elaborate counterpoint of many of his contemporaries, preferring simple line and homophonic textures, yet seeking rhythmic variety and sometimes including intense and surprising contrasts. His melodic writing and use of dissonance is more free than that of Palestrina; occasionally he uses intervals which are prohibited in the strict application of 16th century counterpoint, such as ascending major sixths, or even occasional diminished fourths (for example, a melodic diminished fourth occurs in a passage representing grief in his motet Sancta Maria, succurre). Victoria sometimes uses dramatic word-painting, of a kind usually found only in madrigals. Some of his sacred music uses instruments (a practice which is not uncommon in Spanish sacred music of the 16th century), and he also wrote polychoral works for more than one spatially separated group of singers, in the style of the composers of the Venetian school who were working at St. Mark's in Venice.

The three days leading up to Easter Sunday – Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday – have always been days of special significance in the Christian church. In the Roman Catholic tradition these three days – the Triduum – are marked by liturgies of special solemnity during which the Passion and Death of Christ are marked and contemplated prior to the celebration of the Resurrection. Naturally, much of the liturgical observance during these days is meditative in nature. Nowhere was observance of the solemnity of the Triduum more marked than in Counter Reformation Spain. Victoria composed this music to be sung at the office of Matins on each of the three days.

There are three Lamentations for each of the three days and every one ends with the poignant phrase ‘Jerusalem, Jerusalem, convertere ad Dominum Deus tuum’ (‘Jerusalem, Jerusalem, turn to the Lord your God’). These phrases bring a musical and literary unity to the music, though it’s very important to remember that originally they would not have all been heard together. However, I think there’s a very strong case for hearing them as a sequence.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom%C3%A1s_Luis_de_Victoria ).

Although originally created for four (4) voices (SATB), I created this Interpretation of the "Missa Ave maris stella" (Hail Star of the Sea) for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, & Bassoon).

Dance of the Mirlitons

5 parts11 pages02:223 days ago11 views
Flute(5)
As an avid Tchaikovsky fan and flautist, I decided to arrange "Dance of the Mirlitons" from The Nutcracker Ballet for a flute quintet, both for personal amusement and ensemble use.
Largo from the Concerto in C Major (RV 555 Mvt. 2) for Flute & Harp
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Largo from the Concerto in C Major (RV 555 Mvt. 2) for Flute & Harp

2 parts4 pages01:474 days ago33 views
Flute, Harp
Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741) was an Italian Baroque musical composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher, and priest. Born in Venice, the capital of the Venetian Republic, he is regarded as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe. He composed many instrumental concertos, for the violin and a variety of other instruments, as well as sacred choral works and more than forty operas. His best-known work is a series of violin concertos known as the Four Seasons.

Details regarding Vivaldi's early life are few. His father was a violinist in the Catherdral of Venice's orchestra and probably Antonio's first teacher. There is much speculation about other teachers, such as Corelli, but no evidence to support this. Vivaldi studied for the priesthood as a young man and was ordained in 1703. He was known for much of his career as "il prete rosso" (the red-haired priest), but soon after his ordination he declined to take on his ecclesiastical duties. Later in life he cited ill health as the reason, but other motivations have been proposed; perhaps Vivaldi simply wanted to explore new opportunties as a composer. It didn't take him long. Landing a job as a violin teacher at a girls' orphanage in Venice (where he would work in one capacity or another during several stretches of his life), he published a set of trio sonatas and another of violin sonatas. Word of his abilities spread around Europe, and in 1711 an Amsterdam publisher brought out, under the title L'estro armonico (Harmonic Inspiration), a set of Vivaldi's concertos for one or more violins with orchestra. These were best sellers (it was this group of concertos that spurred Bach's transcriptions), and Vivaldi followed them up with several more equally successful concerto sets. Perhaps the most prolific of all the great European composers, he once boasted that he could compose a concerto faster than a copyist could ready the individual parts for the players in the orchestra. He began to compose operas, worked from 1718 to 1720 in the court of the German principality of Hessen-Darmstadt, and traveled in Austria and perhaps Bohemia. Throughout his career, he had his choice of commissions from nobility and the highest members of society, the ability to use the best performers, and enough business savvy to try to control the publication of his works, although due to his popularity, many were published without his consent. Later in life Vivaldi was plagued by rumors of a sexual liaison with one of his vocal students, and he was censured by ecclesiastical authorities. His Italian career on the rocks, he headed for Vienna. He died there and was buried as a pauper in 1741, although at the height of his career his publications had earned a comfortable living.

This concerto remains a riddle—the identity of the pair of instruments that appear for the first time in the finale and are labelled ‘2 Trombe’. The problem with accepting this designation at face value is that these parts, while often fanfare-like in character and therefore related in a general sense to the trumpet style, contain too many notes in the octave above middle C that are unplayable on the natural instrument. There are other technical difficulties, and also problems of balance with the rest of the ensemble. Robert King’s novel solution, which is fully convincing, is to interpret trombe as a shorthand form of violini in tromba marina (the recording employs ordinary violins played near the bridge and making maximum use of harmonics in an attempt to simulate the historical instruments). There is a precedent for this. For a similar concerto in C major, RV558 (specially written for a visit of Frederick Augustus’ son to the Pietà in 1740), Vivaldi’s copyist wrote ‘violini in tromba marina’ on the title-page but abbreviated this to ‘trombe’ or ‘trombe marine’ in the score itself. The relevant parts in RV555 possess exactly the same general characteristics as those in RV558. Similarly, the ‘violino in tromba’ required in the solo concertos RV221, 311 and 313 may in reality be, as argued by Cesare Fertonani in a recent book on Vivaldi’s instrumental music, a ‘violino in tromba marina’. The point is that, with Vivaldi, so many options remain open: what was yesterday’s heresy can so easily turn into today’s orthodoxy..

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/antonio-vivaldi-mn0000685058/biography ).

Although originally created for 3 Violins, Oboe, Viola all'inglese, Chalmeleau, 2 Cellos, Harpsichord, Strings & Basso Continuo, I created this Arrangement of the Largo from the Concerto in C Major (RV 555) for Flute & Concert (Pedal) Harp.

"Fo' dA Deceased J.E" or "2violins" or " smooth sMokEd butts and violent ViolinS fo'black composer Julius Eastman

49 parts9 pages04:2122 days ago192 views
Piccolo, Flute(2), Oboe, Clarinet(3), Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Bassoon, Baritone Saxophone, French Horn(2), Trumpet, Trombone, Timpani, Percussion(13), English Horn, Guitar, Piano, Bass, Harpsichord, Harp, Violin(2), Strings(6), Cello(2), Contrabass(4)
i want to put some more music in here BrahmsA major CaprIt some disco music in here of my own we'll see ! Dream of a Future concert Scene whre Classical music is . I can't focus when i see dem white skinned muscle it takes me to the hereafter . I'm obsessed with muscle hopew i win a loterry . But I never buy tickets ! oh well !
not relegated to the never visited museum or the back seat
with a car radio while someone is relaxing but is right there in the big stage arena like Hollywood Bowl used to be (I fitrst saw Ilana Vered play the Brahms 2nd concerto there !) with other concerts musics - we must find a way to bring more audiences to classical music while keeping the integrity of all said musics in place no watering down but tee-shirts , booze , shorts and just plain old folks listening to the music
that thrills them whether it be LouReed and Patti Smith or The Gogo's or Unsuk Chin and Matthew Pintscher . .In “8 Songs for a Mad King”, Davies uses extended techniques to the extreme. The strings use extreme, icky glissandi, the winds use flutter tongue and overtones, but the party really comes from the tenor that plays the part of the mad king. He goes nuts with a range that covers somewhere in the ballpark of five and a half octaves, going from the Fry register to extreme falsetto. If there is such thing as whistle singing for men, I sure hope this guy uses it! Anyway, in using this extreme range, the vocal performer often changes registers quickly and unexpectedly, heightening the effect of the king’s madness. There are also many “unpure” timbres the king uses, again to further the effect of madness, but also to reinforce ideas that are present in the text.In Schwantner’s piece, one of my favorite effects he uses is rolling the cymals on the timpani, while changing pitch. This creates a very eerie feel, as the long ringing of the cymbal is what vibrates the head of the timpani, further changing the sound we areSheCow America fails and falls once again into the powerful spiritual battle of Beelzebub the heCow . I make oil paintings and jointcompound pics on dee side . mum can ya spare some change . my cat needs sum chowchupar . I deem to make classicalmusic to and of the streets like Berlioz and that "Guerillafag" "Crazy Niggah" composer who died in New York City in 1990 . He is featured singing on the first recording of 8 Songs for a Mad King .Eight Songs for a Mad King is a monodrama by Sir Peter Maxwell Davies with a libretto by Randolph Stow, based on words of George III. The work was written for the South-African actor Roy Hart and the composer's ensemble, the Pierrot Players. It was premiered on 22 April 1969.

Lasting half an hour, it is scored for a baritone with an extraordinary command of extended techniques covering more than five octaves, and six players (Pierrot ensemble + percussion):

flute (doubling piccolo)
clarinet
percussion (1 player): railway whistle, snare drum, 2 suspended cymbals, foot cymbal, 2 wood blocks, bass drum, chains, ratchet, tom-toms, tamtam!!!, tambourine, rototoms, toy bird-calls, 2 temple blocks, wind chimes, crotales, sleigh bells!!!, glockenspiel, steel bars !!!, crow, didgeridoo!!!
piano (doubling harpsichord and dulcimer)
violin
cello
The songs derive from tunes played by an extant mechanical organ owned by George III, tunes that he attempted to train bullfinches to sing:

The Sentry (King Prussia's Minuet)
The Country Walk (La Promenade)
The Lady-In-Waiting (Miss Musgrave's Fancy)
To Be Sung on the Water (The Waterman)
The Phantom Queen (He's Ay A-Kissing Me)
The Counterfeit (Le Conterfaite)
Country Dance (Scotch Bonnett)
The Review (A Spanish March)
The action unfolds as a soliloquy by the king, the players being placed on stage (ideally) in large birdcages, and climaxes in his snatching and smashing the violin.
In life as in the movie and Alan Bennets play George regains his senses .I just finished reading Alan Bennet'sThe Uncommon Reader ! Everything he does is fine Much gentler book than his earlier The History Boys .I loved that !

The score is published by Boosey & Hawkes, and its cover shows a famous excerpt in which the staves are arranged like the bars of a birdcage.[1]

Besides Hart, exponents of this work have included William Pearson, Michael Rippon, Thomas Meglioranza, Julius Eastman and Vincent Ranallo. The Swedish baritone Olle Perss Good day to your Honesty
on performed the work in Stockholm in the 1990s. The British baritone Richard Suart has performed the piece in Gelsenkirchen‚ Milan‚ Helsinki‚ Strasbourg‚ Stavanger and Paris; in 1987 The Musical Times described Suart's take as "compelling from start to finish".[2] Welsh baritone Kelvin Thomas sang the role at Munich's Kammerspiele Schauspielhaus in 2011, and in a production by Music Theatre Wales in 2013.

Peter Maxwell Davies 8 Songs For A Mad King (1969)
Good day to your Honesty
God guard who guards the gate
The Sentry Lyrics
Here is the key of the kingdom
You are a pretty fellow:
Next month I shall give you a cabbage
Undo the door!
Who has stolen my key?
Ach! my kingdom is snakes and dancing
My kingdom is locks and slithering. Make room!
Pity me, pity me, pity me. Child
Child whose son are you?8 Songs for aMadKing
The Sentry'sLryics

The Queen's Lady-in -Waiting Song

Madam let us talk, let us talk
Madam I mean no harm
Only to remember, to remember
What it was that through silk
Lace, linen and brocade
Swooped on my needle. To remember
Madam, let us talk, talk, talk, talk
I mean no harm, no harm, no harm, no
The Phantom Queen's Song
Where is the Queen? Why does she not visit me?
Esther, Esther, O my heart's ease
Have they chained you too, my darling, in a stable?
Do they starve you, strike you, scorn you, ape your howls?
They say some other woman is your wife
But the Queen's name is Esther, Esther
Fall on my eyes, O bride like a starless night

Winterwind

6 parts19 pages02:125 months ago102 views
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Trombone, Percussion, Harp
"Serenade des amants absents", for strings and flutes - ver. 5.11.17 revision.
Video

"Serenade des amants absents", for strings and flutes - ver. 5.11.17 revision.

8 parts61 pages09:552 years ago1,019 views
Flute(2), Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
This score incorporates a number of changes, most to add or remove some articulations, though I have reworked bars 188 -191. This is some of my most emotional writing. It's not for those who can't concentrate.The full complement of strings start at bar 17.

The genesis of this score is a 50-bar sketch dating from the early 1990s. I transcribed the draft onto MS more than 12 months ago. It then lay around whilst I did other things and waited until the motivation returned.

It could be my best score(?) Let my know your thoughts.

This score is created from a Sibelius score via xml.

Concerto Madrigalesco in D Minor (RV 129) for Winds & Strings

7 parts9 pages04:548 days ago23 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741) was an Italian Baroque musical composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher, and priest. Born in Venice, the capital of the Venetian Republic, he is regarded as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe. He composed many instrumental concertos, for the violin and a variety of other instruments, as well as sacred choral works and more than forty operas. His best-known work is a series of violin concertos known as the Four Seasons.

The Concerto for strings, RV 129, is one of the more than 140 concertos Vivaldi composed between 1723 and 1729. The works had been commissioned for performance by the young female players at the Pio Ospedale della Pietà in Venice, the orphanage-cum-music conservatory where Vivaldi had held a teaching appointment in earlier years. As concerts at the institution contributed significantly to the Venetian cultural identity, the school continued to solicit new pieces from Vivaldi after his departure, requesting an average of two concertos per month. While the sheer volume of this output has historically opened Vivaldi to criticism of being compositionally formulaic and uninventive, the D minor concerto, RV 129, distinguishes itself from the majority in a number of regards. For one thing, it contains not three movements but four, with the usual fast-slow-fast configuration prefaced by a short, slow movement. Also, it is one of a handful of concertos with which the composer supplied nicknames. This so-called "Madrigalesque" concerto seeks, in the contour and flow of its melodies, to create a distinctly vocal quality. In this regard, though, Vivaldi does prove his comfort with creative economy and musical expediency: not only are the melodies song-ish, but some of them are actually recycled extensively from earlier vocal works.

Considered in this light, the opening Adagio -- with its diminutive length, languid pace, and ethereal, yearning harmonic twists -- takes on the feel of an operatic instrumental introduction to a dramatic vocal number rather than an independent movement of an instrumental work. The quick second movement does not articulate the clear ritornello form for which Vivaldi's opening Allegro movements are known, but rather presents an urgent theme subjected to continuous fugal treatment; this music is borrowed almost entirely from the second Kyrie eleison from the composer's own Kyrie in G minor, RV 587. Much like the first movement, the subsequent Adagio is not so much a proper movement as an interlude to the concerto's finale. This closing Allegro is also built upon a borrowed foundation, transposed and rescored from the finale of Vivaldi's Magnificat in G minor, RV 610. Though busy and intricate, this last movement is also brief. In fact, the concerto as a whole lasts less than three-and-a-half minutes in most performances. Rather than relying on the structural and harmonic expectations established in his other works, the Concerto madrigalesco takes a decidedly more emotionally direct, melodically expressive tack.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/concerto-madrigalesco-for-strings-continuo-in-d-minor-rv-129-mc0002357571 ).

Although originally created for Strings & Basso Continuo, I created this Arrangement of the Concerto Madrigalesco in D Minor (RV 129) for Winds (Flute, Oboe & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

OVERTURE to "Antigone" | Jakob Altmann

16 parts47 pages04:2813 days ago170 views
Flute, Oboe(2), Clarinet, Bassoon, French Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Timpani, Percussion(2), Violin(2), Viola, Cello, Contrabass
This is the Overture to my opera Antigone, that I am currently working on! I´m pretty proud of this piece, so please tell me what you think!
I already uploaded the Intro to the second act a month ago, if you´re interested, check it out!
Jakob

Divine Blessings

13 parts13 pages01:49a year ago507 views
Piccolo, Flute(2), Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, French Horn, Trombone, Piano(4), Harp
Mobile user:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SSVD8ber8BI

Hey guys!

After so much time, I finally *overcome* the writer's block. A good friend of mine was discussing about this piece I made. For me, it's a big success.
It is 3 in the morning when I just finished.
This piece has a special meaning. It is related to somewhere you would normally go on Sundays.
As I compose, I continuously enjoy the sound of music, for it shall bring peace to the mind...................

Your composer,
TheLight OI

Yearning for Spring (Original Composition for Flute, Violin and Piano)

3 parts6 pages02a month ago350 views
Flute, Violin, Piano
Chicago has experienced yet another weird winter, much warmer on average, with the deadly record-breaking -70F polar vortex in the middle, and the never ending spiral of rains and cold sunny days. Now the temperature fluctuates around frost point while no trees are having green leaves. Before you know it, viola(*sic by autocorrect fail*) it's gonna be summer...

Spring never exists in Chicago.

But still I want to paint the picture of the transition as it's just past spring equinox. A bit of hope, a bit of impatience and traces of sentiment of missing the winter snow. This is My First™ piece involving the piano. Honestly it's much harder than orchestral work to me because I suck at piano (I do play though) and cannot play it nicely to get realistic feedback.

Comments greatly appreciated as always!

Concerto in F Major (RV 100) for Winds & Strings

7 parts22 pages07:5012 days ago35 views
Flute, Oboe, Bassoon, Violin(2), Viola, Cello
Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741) was an Italian Baroque musical composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher, and priest. Born in Venice, the capital of the Venetian Republic, he is regarded as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe. He composed many instrumental concertos, for the violin and a variety of other instruments, as well as sacred choral works and more than forty operas. His best-known work is a series of violin concertos known as the Four Seasons.

One of the handy things about Antonio Vivaldi, from a violinist/conductor’s point of view, is that few composers sound at once so familiar and so fresh. You can, of course, make up a disc-length program of Vivaldi concertos that everyone already knows; but it’s as easy (and much more fun) to make up a disc-length program of Vivaldi concertos such that only one person in 10,000 will know every piece on the bill.

Chamber Concerto in F Major (RV 100) is sweetly melodic and rich in contrasting shadows and lights. There is something about the layering of voices which exposes accompanying lines at the expense of the flute and the violin comes out equally whether playing counter-melodies, a solo line or a rhythmic background. The bassoon is a little lower in the mix in this piece which helps, but there is a general flatness of dynamic. A welcome change is the Largo, which is another toothsome duet between the bassoon and flute.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/artist/antonio-vivaldi-mn0000685058/biography ).

Although originally created for Flute, Violin, Bassoon, Strings, & Basso Continuo, I created this Arrangement of the Chamber Concerto in F Major (RV 100) for Winds (Flute, Oboe & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).

Family Love

4 parts12 pages06:5413 days ago13 views
Flute, Voice(2), Piano
This is a medley of three songs: Love is Spoken Here, Love at Home, and Families Can Be Together Forever. With the world trying to destroy families, my choir director in our ward wanted a family-themed song for mother's day, and this resulted. I really hope you enjoy!

The piano in the last chorus plays the melody of the part of the song that is to be brought out. Either the men or the women bring out their part that is usually four measures at a time. You'll know when the words are bolded.

Finally, I am sorry to the poor flutist who has to put up with this song! I know multiple flats are not easy to play, so I'm sorry!
🎧 Symphonic Poem ~Galactic Wings~ (Original Composition)
Custom audio

🎧 Symphonic Poem ~Galactic Wings~ (Original Composition)

36 parts32 pages08:352 months ago1,095 views
Flute(2), Oboe(2), Clarinet(2), Bassoon(2), French Horn(3), Brass Ensemble(2), Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Percussion(8), Piano(2), Harp, Voice(4), Strings(4), Contrabass
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Don't forget to check out other songs in the "Galactic Wings" suite :-) https://musescore.com/user/47446/sets/5097271

This is my fourth composition and first for symphony orchestra and choir. I started this project half a year ago with zilch knowledge in instrumentation. I managed to scramble up a one-minute demo piece, then decided it was a totally crazy and unrealistic attempt to write a symphonic poem as my first orchestral work. Winter came and I caught a bad cold and wasn't able to work out for a whole month. Being bored, I thought maybe I should see how far I can go on this. It just went far beyond my original expectation and I feel more than proud of this first draft.

It is a very fast-paced, almost cinematic story-telling piece, consisting of 5 acts and an epilogue:
1. Call for Warriors
2. A Fleeting Farewell
3. Battlefront
4. Dirge of Dawn
5. Hymn of Rebirth
Epilogue: Priceless Peace
You may be able to guess what the story is like, and I'll let the music speak for me. Due to the limitation of my ability, time and energy, each act lasts only 1-2 minutes. I didn't plan to write even longer as fewer people would have the patience to finish listening.

Some of my own primer's study notes:
1. Learn the instruments. Train my ears to at least tell which instruments are playing in a symphonic piece.
2. Transcribe a symphonic work (time consuming but I found it really helpful)
3. Violins are really great in painting the high-frequency range of the audio (like painting the sky)
4. Be prepared to get stuck at transitions. Transitions, which consists of <25% of this piece, took me about 75% of the time in total.
5. Never give up when stuck...(hard)
6. Use a decent soundfont or you'll lose patience even faster (unless you are a maestro who doesn't need to listen when writing)
7. Chord progression is important but I find its a trap to fixate on chords. That'll make the work sound like vertical bars. I find it more important to figure out the instrumentation first (in my case, which instruments to play the melody, and when there are sustained notes in melody, what other instruments to provide the texture).
8. Take down every motif you have. They may somehow interweave with each other.
9. Horns are the warmest sounds ever @_@
10. Bassoon sounds weird and somehow hard to use for beginners like myself...But try everything you can to use it (in this case it magically worked better than any other for Section D)
11. I tend to write percussions at the end of a segment I write. I feel after adding percussion, the sound will become noisy and harder for me to find out what's missing/excessive. Plus, it's very satisfying when I add percussion as finishing touches.
12. Flute trills are cliche but quite easy to light up the mood or add some extra tension.
13. Don't use extra low/loud bass all the time. Entering/exiting of low bass is very noticeable and can be used as mood adjusters in ones arsenal. Same as high-pitched sounds like violins and trumpets.
14. Modulation works well when repeating a melody.
15. Warfare scenes are easier to write than I had thought. There are a lot of "epic battle music" on YouTube, but they all sound incredibly similar: heavy drums on 4/4 rhythms, choirs, string ensembles, TUBULAR BELLS, layers of buildup, all with simple chord loops. There must be something more to it. But many are just from the same template...

Things I still feel very weak:
1. Use woodwind to create interweaving texture
2. Use of viola and cello
3. Dissonance (this piece has almost none except a little in Section C)
4. Pitched percussions besides tubular bells (I think I abused it)
5. Mood expression without clear melodies. I think mostly in melodies...I need to learn to be more sensitive to chords and texture...

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Thank you for reading the description, and I really hope you can listen to the whole song, and share the part you (dis-)like the most. Your encouragements and critics are very valuable to keep me motivated!